Fungi Families/Types Identity Parade

Pictures, habitat descriptions, spore colour, and macroscopic / microscopic identifying features of more than 500 fungi species, with links to picture galleries and detailed identification guides for each individual species:

Field mushrooms and their relatives
Agaricaceae
Amanita fungi
Amanitaceae
Bolbitiaceae
Bolbitiaceae
Boletes and their relatives
Boletales
Poriales and other Bracket Fungi
Brackets/Crusts
Chanterelles and related species
Cantharellales
Clavariaceae
Clavariaceae
Cortinariaceae
Cortinariaceae
Dacrymycetaceae
Dacrymycetaceae
Entolomataceae
Entolomataceae
Puffballs, Earthstars, Stalkballs and Earthballs
Gasteromycetes
Waxcaps
Hygrophoraceae
Inocybaceae (fibrecaps)
Inocybaceae
Jelly Fungi
Jelly Fungi
Lyophyllaceae
Lyophyllaceae
Marasmiaceae
Marasmiaceae
Mycenaceae
Mycenaceae
Pleurotaceae
Pleurotaceae
Pluteaceae
Pluteaceae
Ink Caps and their relatives
Psathyrellaceae
Russulas and Milk Caps
Russulaceae
Strophariaceae (Pholoitas and relatives) plus Bolbitiaceae
Strophariaceae
Tricholomas and their relatives
Tricholomataceae
Cup and Flask fungi
Ascomycetes

Mycologists arrange fungi into classes > orders > families > genera > species. Fungus orders and families are the basis for most of the Identification sections of this Guide.

For ease of use we have grouped all jelly fungi (heterobasidiomycetes) together. Similarly all bracket and crust fungi are also grouped, as also are the various puffballs, earthballs, earthstars and stiltballs that, together with stinkhorns, are by tradition called gasteromycetes (even though there is no scientific justification for their being categorised together other than the fact that they all produce spores inside some kind of ball or 'stomach').

Only the most common families are included in the table above; however, full details of hundreds of species, arranged alphabetically in their mycological families, can be accessed via our Fungi Family Index Page...

Go on: try our Fungi Knowledge Quiz...

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